Jordan Road Trip Part III: The Dead Sea to Madaba

Mid-morning on day five of our road trip we began our drive up the windy route through the hills toward the historical city of Madaba, where I (Albert) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer. With the Dead Sea receding in the distance behind us, my excitement grew.  I had been looking forward to returning to Madaba since I left nearly 8 years ago.  This return though was put on a brief hold when we stopped at the Dead Sea Panoramic Complex to take in the sweeping views of the sea and the valley below and also to visit the museum.  It cost 2 JD per person to enter.

View of the Dead Sea from the Dead Sea Panoramic Complex

View of the Dead Sea from the Dead Sea Panoramic Complex

I had visited the complex during my service as part of a Tourism Awareness Program I developed to teach youth about the role tourism plays in their community.  The museum is devoted to telling the history of the Dead Sea and importantly highlights the continuous reduction in the sea’s water level, an alarming 3 ft. per year.

This depicts the dramatic change in size of the Dead Sea

This depicts the dramatic change in size of the Dead Sea

Having spent two years living in Madaba and working on tourism projects I was fairly familiar with the city’s hotel options.  We ended up choosing a small family run hotel located in the city center, the Mosaic City Hotel, which opened across the street from where I lived towards the end of my service.

Our room at Mosaic City Hotel

Our room at Mosaic City Hotel

 

I knew the project had been supported by a USAID grant, but what I didn’t know was that the family started off with a few rooms on one floor, while they lived on another and slowly expanded as their business grew.  The hotel now covers three floors, has a kitchen and dining room, and shop selling Dead Sea and other Jordan-made products.  The hotel and its rooms are simple, extremely clean and tastefully decorated.  The breakfast selection was superb and the experience was made complete with the sound of Fairuz gently wafting through the dining room while we ate.  For those unaware, Fairuz is a Lebanese singer with a beautiful voice whose music is traditionally listened to in the morning.  If you’re going to Madaba we definitely recommend staying here.

Welcome to Madaba!

Welcome to Madaba!

Madaba’s is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Jordan with Mt. Nebo (Moses sighting of the promised land), Bethany-beyond-the-Jordan (Jesus’ baptism site), Wadi Mujib, Umm ar-Rasas (UNESCO World Heritage Site) and Mukawir (the site of John’s the Baptist’s imprisonment and beheading), all within easy reach.  The city itself contains several landmarks that should not be overlooked, including St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church and the Archaeological Park.  St. George’s contains a mosaic from the sixth century and the Archaeological Park displays the excavated ruins of several Byzantine churches and two spectacular mosaics.

St. George's Greek Orthodox Church contains a 6th century mosaic of the Palestine.

St. George's Greek Orthodox Church contains a 6th century mosaic of the Palestine.

Archeological Park Madaba

Archeological Park Madaba

If you couldn’t tell from above or weren’t aware, Madaba is known for its mosaics. Back as Peace Corps Volunteer I was only able to afford one piece, which I gave to my brother and sister-in-law as a wedding present.  This time we were able to afford one of our own which hangs in our living room. Madaba has its own mosaic school where students learn the artwork.

Read: A beginner's guide to Amman

Mosaic inside the Church of the Virgin built in 767 AD

Mosaic inside the Church of the Virgin built in 767 AD

Apart from the numerous shawarma and falafel restaurants, Madaba also has a great selection of upscale restaurants.  During my time there I became good friends with one of the most important business leaders of Madaba’s tourism industry and our visit would not be complete without spending an evening with Mr. Bassam Twal at his restaurant, Dana.  It was here I spent many nights planning my Tourism Awareness Programs, drafting speeches and eating sajia, which we were served that night among many other amazing dishes.  We, of course, had to have some St. George’s, which as you may recall is one of Jordan’s top wineries and happens to be from Madaba and the final Carak Ale that we hadn’t yet tried, the Pale Ale.  It was a wonderful opportunity to taste the foods we had been missing and catch up with a great friend.  If you’re in Madaba be sure to check out Dana Restaurant not far from Apostles Church.

Mutabal at Dana Restaurant

Mutabal at Dana Restaurant

The house special, Sajia at Dana

The house special, Sajia at Dana

Our good friend Bassam and us enjoying a delicious meal at Dana Restaurant

Our good friend Bassam and us enjoying a delicious meal at Dana Restaurant

After this nostalgic visit, the following day Carrie and I dropped our car at the airport and boarded a plane to Beirut.  Check out our guide to Beirut, Lebanon below.

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